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Weekend Survey: One Day of Silence?

This question applies to both bloggers and non-bloggers.

In a response to the murders at Virginia Tech this week, a website was started that encourages all bloggers to not blog on April 30th.

On April 30th 2007, the Blogosphere will hold a One-Day Blog Silence in honor of the victims at Virginia Tech. More then 30 died at the US college massacre.

But it´s not only about them. Many bloggers have responded and asked about all the other victims of our world. All the people who die every day. What about them?

This day can be a symbol of support to all the victims of our world!

If you are a blogger, do you plan to participate? If not, then why?

If you are one without a blog, what do you think of a “day of silence” for all bloggers?

By the way, April 20th is the anniversary of the Columbine Shootings.

Writer and software engineer Ronald Huereca has been a developer at notable agencies like iThemes and 10up. His varied background has him working with WordPress since 2006, eventually creating his own plugin which, of course, lead to more. He spends quite a bit of his time volunteering with the WordPress project as a core and polyglot contributor. With all of his passions, writing has been the way Ronald expresses himself best. He has written both technical books as well as fiction. Some of his works include Project Mayhem, Mindefusement, and WordPress and Ajax. “You can only delay the inevitable” is his favorite quote. Ronald enjoys reading Stephen King and John Grisham. When he’s not writing, Ronald dreams of building websites filled with cats yawning, disclaimers his strong opinions, sings karaoke, and advocates for empathy surrounding mental health.

10 thoughts on “Weekend Survey: One Day of Silence?”

  1. I will not be participating, as it does not make sense at all. Silence for what? How does silence honor anyone? Who came up with the notion that being silence honors the dead?

    People just want to feel better by not actually doing anything but holding such "days of silence" trends. These are just internet memes; I will be doing actual work to help people.

    Offline, such a strategy does no good, so far, for people who die. How does this help anyone online? I don't get it.

  2. Although I may be silent on that day it won't be deliberate.

    I understand the purpose of the 1 minute silence is to spend that time contemplating the subject of the silence. It seems to me that if this is something a blogger feels particularly strongly about they should write about how it personally affects them, i.e. they should contemplate it in writing.

    As awful as all these matters are they are a social issue that needs to be resolved and, while writing about it might help, staying silent almost surely won't.

  3. Silent? Me? Never!

    When I first time visited that site and expressed my thoughts about the Day of Silence on my blog, I questioned the placement of a Digg counter/icon there which had 17 diggs. Just out of curiosity, I just checked that site again, and guess what – it already got 112 diggs. Congratulations to that site's owner – you've been dugg. Was that the sole purpose of launching your Onedayblogsilence.com? Did you check that site's Technorati ranking?
    Rank: 13,404 (367 links from 268 blogs)
    Isn't it impressive?! In 3 days?!

    There are 10 more days left till April 30th. Perhaps by then it'll reach Technorati Top 100, and it'll be another proof of how dumb the masses are, and how some can manipulate the crowd, play on people's feelings and make a profit for themselves, built on others pain and suffering. I've seen it happening in real life, and now it happened in the blogosphere.

  4. I personally don't plan to participate. A blogosphere day of remembrance perhaps would be better. Silence though? The website and its message seem too opportunistic and it seems more like a boycott than a moment of silence.

  5. I think I should add, just by way of adding balance, that perhaps the author is very genuine and honestly feels this is the right thing to do. I disagree but I could be wrong; it wouldn't be the first time.

    Perhaps the Digg option is simply a way of spreading the good word, which seems to have worked.

  6. Andrew,

    I don't disagree that the author may be very genuine and feel that being silent is the right thing to do. However, I do disagree with the idea behind the silence and feel that speaking out is a much better option.

    Social media is a smart way to promote the issue and the author is fully entitled to do so. However, one must have to wonder that with an idea so good, why is Digg necessary? And furthermore, what happens when the day of silence is over?

  7. I'm not sure I had much of an opinion on the Day of Silence, but after reading these comments, I'm surprised by the rather negative attitude exhibited here.

    Typically, a moment of silence is held during a memorial service in order to pray or just remember. I don't recall ever hearing people being upset about having a moment of silence in that situation. How would a moment of silence look like in the "blogosphere"? Would anyone notice 5 minutes of not posting? Probably not.

    I could go either way on this topic. On one side, I think it is an excellent idea to take a day off from writing about the event and using it to push various ideas (gun control, no gun control, "think of the children"). It would be refreshing to not be beat over the head with everyone and their brother/sister/father/mother writing about this.

    On the flip side, as several have mentioned, being silent really doesn't do anything. The only person it could help is someone who takes the time to consider the situation and what their response should be. Introspection is the word of the day.

    As far as the website taking advantage of the situation thought. I checked out the site, too. There were no ads, so the person is not making any money from the site. There is no content about who put up the site (yeah, I know it is possible to figure out who owns the site). At least for the moment, the site appears to be simply what it presents itself to be: a site asking others to hold a day of blogging silence. Who know what it could mutate into after Monday?

    On a personal note, what will I do on Monday when I have no new blog material to read when I'm bored at work? The horror! 🙂

    cetroyer

  8. cetroyer,

    A lot of the arguments towards the day of silence speak to real life examples of the power of silence. In the offline world, moments of silence can be helpful and are a sign of respect and remembrance (and a chance to pray). In the online world, however, what does a "moment of silence" look and feel like? Is it going to be less blog posts in the Feed Reader?

  9. I had checked this out a few days ago and even decided at one point to do it, even posting on the site to state I would. Then, began thinking about it more and now have mixed feelings. I've already memorialized VT students, faculty, and families who lost loved ones in a couple of ways with my 4/18 Wordless Wednesday, and on 4/17 a prayer circle was formed with other bloggers. The VT students are back to school this week having held their own vigils and moments of silence last week. So I guess my feelings are the date possibly should have been earlier? However, that is just my own humble opinion. April 30 is the time those who are holding the one day blog silence have chosen; so I feel it is up to each individual blogger whether to participate and I respect their decision to memorialize in their own way just as I did on my blog. I'm rarely a daily blogger anyway.

    Also, the site does state it can be to honor other tragedies as well.

    My two cents, or maybe more like a penny. 😉

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