The Tip From Hell

I was at the local Monaco Pictures watching a movie. Afterwards, I asked my lady friend if she would like to get a drink at their bar.

“Sure.” she said.

We proceeded to have a few drinks and some rather bland quesadillas.

As closing time approached for the bar, the waitress handed us our bill.

My lady friend covered her eyes, “Don’t worry, I won’t look at the total.”

“It’s okay.” I smiled. “I actually want you to help me decide on a tip amount.”

She grabbed the receipt from my hand and suggested an amount.

“Too low…” I replied.

She sighed, and I explained, “My roommate’s a waiter. He’ll never let me hear the end of it.”

“Why don’t you make it an even $45?” she suggested.

I did the math in my head and covered my mouth trying to contain my shock and laughter.

After we got up to leave the restaurant, I approached our waitress, “Try not to take your tip too personal. It just worked out that way.”

The waitress smiled as we both walked out of the theater.

The amount? A solid and crisp $6.66.

$6.66 tip amount

18 Comments

  1. Without wanting to re-live the beginning of Reservoir Dogs, tipping servers just encourages their continued underpayment by their employers.

  2. I would like to agree with Andrew, but then it’s more like Catch-22: it’s impossible to get everyone stop tipping, so the servers will be continually underpaid, plus mad at those who don’t tip.

    I’d like to know where/when did the tipping tradition start? Why nobody would consider tipping a web designer, for instance, for the work well done? 😉

  3. That is strange. However, statistically, that number is in the common range for tips, since meals often cost about that amount.

  4. Paintball Guns: While that is true statistically, many people would notice the amount and modify their tip, so that amount is probably tipped less frequently because of human intervention.

  5. Really interesting tip=) I often meet such tips in my life.

  6. Heh, 666. I rode with a bus numbered like this in our country.

  7. Well you could have paid $44.99 instead. 🙂 Would have made for a nice puzzle for the waiter to work out…

  8. being a bar tender/waiter myself. thank you for tipping. but as for the “666” issue. i never read to much into it. I have been a “victim” of the same thing. well i wouldnt really call it victim but you get my drift. it may be the mark of the beast but its simply numbers to me.

  9. That’s too funny – why not change it 1 cent? I guess anything to please the lady friend…reminds me of China’s interest rate cut a few months ago – yep, 6.66%

  10. I suppose that if the tip were some other random number, we would never think twice. But when the tip is 666, it’s noticed. One strange aspect of statistics is that although numbers may occur the same amount of time, certain numbers get noticed by humans more often.

  11. @ Andrew it’s getting to a point where everyone expects a tip.

  12. it doesnt matter … but i guess im not superstitious … i ate at a buddies pizza place the other day and hew as talking about the same thing with the change due and well i didnt want to offend him so i kept my mouth shut but it was kind of weird he doesnt seem like a religious person.

  13. Hilarious, i used to be a waiter and so did my wife, so we are really anal about leaving good tips….glad you left a decent tip.

  14. I always leave a good tip. Some waiters only make 2.50 an hour.

  15. Hi there,

    Enjoyed your blog very much, and i just wanted to say keep up the good work!!!

  16. Lol. That is funny. Glad to hear you left a decent tip. Here in Las Vegas so many servers are missing those good tips since tourism is down.

  17. I was very uncomfortable tipping when I was younger. Up to about the age of 18, someone usually paid for me – parents/relatives, etc. – so when I finally went to college I was always unsure what to tip the waiters. It wasn’t until maybe the age of 20 that I got comfortable with it, and ended up teaching two girlfriends who were also uncomfortable how to tip properly.

    The easy way to do it is take 10% and then multiply by two (for a 20% tip), and then to round down to the neatest number available. Also, for meals I usually give a minimum of $5.

  18. I’d take $6.66 on $38.00 all day. You wouldn’t believe how easily any bill under $50.00 falls into the $2.00 tip zone.

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